Bullying: Where does it Begin?

The BullyRecent suicides by adolescents and children in the wake of ongoing bullying have got us all thinking about bullying. It’s an uncomfortable topic, because so many of us at one time or other have been a victim, a bully or a silent witness (another kind of victim). It’s a broad societal problem.

Challenging a bully involves risk. I once had a manager who ordered a colleague to do something unethical. When she challenged him, he discredited her with lies. When I tried to intervene, I became his target and we both were fired. He then turned on a senior professional who had supported me during the ordeal. That professional, having seen what just happened to me, simply resigned.

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The Paradox of the Need to Control

Attempting to controlWe acknowledge some people as influential. Often influential people have a kind of wisdom about the way they move and talk. They tend to be expansive, as if on a mission to create a better world.

We recognize another type of person with a less flattering term: the control freak. For the person with a high need for control, the dominant characteristic is not wisdom, but fear…

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Some Anxiety Problems are Really Alcohol Problems

Guest Article by Dylan M. Kollman, PhD

Research shows that different people drink for different reasons. Alcohol use has many motivations, and isn’t always linked to anxiousness.

Drinking and anxiety, however, are often connected. Alcohol targets a neurotransmitter in the brain called “GABA.” GABA serves in inhibitory function, meaning it slows the firing of our nervous system. When alcohol activates GABA, it causes symptoms like sedation, muscle relaxation, and decreased coordination.

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Don’t Let Anxiety Become Chronic

I’ve been struck by the number of recent clients with anxiety problems.

Anxiety is a cluster of bodily reactions to a cue, either internal or external. Anxiety involves the release of cortisol into the bloodstream, with accompanying symptoms of increased heart rate, tensed muscles, shortness of breath, and most of all, a sense of impending danger.

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